News

Recent archaeological and paleoanthropological news from around the world.

Filters:
Any time
Site Name
Classification
New findings on the world's oldest wooden hunting weapons – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

New findings on the world's oldest wooden hunting weapons – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Apr 1, 2024

Researchers shed new light on the famous wooden spears of Schöningen and the implications for early human hunting.

Popular Archaeology

Ancient DNA reveals the appearance of a 6th century Chinese emperor – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Ancient DNA reveals the appearance of a 6th century Chinese emperor – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Mar 28, 2024

CELL PRESS—What did an ancient Chinese emperor from 1,500 years ago look like? A team of researchers reconstructed the face of Chinese Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou using DNA extracted from his remains. The study, published March 28 in the journal Current Biology, suggests the emperor’s death at the age of 36 might be linked to a stroke. It also sheds light on the origin and migration patterns of a nomadic empire that once ruled parts of northeastern Asia.

Popular Archaeology

The reason for the proximity between Paleolithic extensive stone quarries and water sources: Elephant hunting by early ... - Popular Archaeology

The reason for the proximity between Paleolithic extensive stone quarries and water sources: Elephant hunting by early ... - Popular Archaeology

Mar 26, 2024

TEL-AVIV UNIVERSITY—Archaeologists from Tel Aviv University have uncovered the mystery surrounding extensive Paleolithic stone quarrying and tool-making sites: Why did Homo erectus repeatedly revisit the very same locations for hundreds of thousands of years? The answer lies in the migration routes of elephants, which they hunted and dismembered using flint tools crafted at these quarrying sites.

Popular Archaeology

The Death Chambers of Herculaneum – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

The Death Chambers of Herculaneum – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Mar 21, 2024

Scientists have teased a horrific story from the remains of the ill-fated inhabitants of a once opulent and thriving seaside city of the Roman Empire.

Popular Archaeology

Toba supereruption unveils new insights into early human migration – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Toba supereruption unveils new insights into early human migration – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Mar 20, 2024

Supereruption but may have facilitated the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa and across the rest of the world.

Popular Archaeology

The Adventure of Archaeology: Ten Fascinating Stories – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

The Adventure of Archaeology: Ten Fascinating Stories – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Mar 12, 2024

A blast from the past: move over, Tomb of Tutankhamun. Here are 10 stories of discovery that you may not know about.

Popular Archaeology

Zhoukoudian Homo Erectus: Peking Man was an Evolutionary Dead-End (Video) - Ancient Origins

Zhoukoudian Homo Erectus: Peking Man was an Evolutionary Dead-End (Video) - Ancient Origins

Mar 11, 2024

Zhoukoudian, home to the renowned Peking Man, serves as a pivotal site for understanding the enigma of Homo erectus and its place in human evolution.

Ancient Origins

Zhoukoudian Homo Erectus: Peking Man was an Evolutionary Dead-End (Video) - Ancient Origins

Zhoukoudian Homo Erectus: Peking Man was an Evolutionary Dead-End (Video) - Ancient Origins

Mar 11, 2024

Zhoukoudian, home to the renowned Peking Man, serves as a pivotal site for understanding the enigma of Homo erectus and its place in human evolution.

Ancient Origins

Timing of early human population bottleneck – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Timing of early human population bottleneck – Popular Archeology - Popular Archaeology

Mar 11, 2024

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES—The migration of hominins out of Africa may have been driven by climatic changes, a study suggests. Genomic studies have suggested that humans underwent a population bottleneck around 0.9 million years ago, but a recent study* of early archaeological sites suggested that this bottleneck occurred around 1.1 million years ago. The dating discrepancy makes it challenging to identify climatic events that may have contributed to a bottleneck. Giovanni Muttoni and Dennis Kent reevaluated the stratigraphic records of early hominin sites across Eurasia to explore the timing and drivers of a hominin population bottleneck. The authors identified a concentration of Eurasian hominin sites reliably dated to 0.9 million years ago. In comparison, the stratigraphic records dating Eurasian sites to greater than 1.1 million years ago were ambiguous and disputed, making associations with climatic events less reliable. The findings are consistent with a rapid migration of hominins and other animals out of Africa around 0.9 million years ago during the first major glaciation of the Pleistocene Epoch, when a drop in sea level opened land routes out of Africa and aridity increased across Africa. According to the authors, the findings suggest that the dispersal of humans out of Africa may have been an adaptive response to a population bottleneck driven by climatic changes around 0.9 million years ago.

Popular Archaeology